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First steps towards characterizing the hierarchical algorithm for curves and ridges pipeline

MPS-Authors

Heng,  Ik Siong
AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

Balasubramanian,  R.
AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

Sathyaprakash,  B. S.
AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Schutz,  Bernard F.
Astrophysical Relativity, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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119883.pdf
(Publisher version), 163KB

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Citation

Heng, I. S., Balasubramanian, R., Sathyaprakash, B. S., & Schutz, B. F. (2004). First steps towards characterizing the hierarchical algorithm for curves and ridges pipeline. Classical and Quantum Gravity, 21, S821-S826. doi:10.1088/0264-9381/21/5/065.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-5136-0
Abstract
The hierarchical algorithm for curves and ridges is a variation of the burst gravitational wave search algorithm known as TFClusters. In this paper, we examine the detection efficiency of the hierarchical algorithm for curves and ridges by injecting sine-Gaussian burst waveforms with four different central frequencies into data acquired by the GEO600 gravitational wave detector during the S1 run. The fluctuation of the output signal-to-noise ratios was observed to be ~5% for frequencies above 1.5 kHz and at least 15% for frequencies below 1.5 kHz. The uncertainty in the estimation of the arrival time is found to be less than 0.05 s.