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Is the squeezing of relic gravitational waves produced by inflation detectable?

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Allen,  Bruce
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Papa,  Maria Alessandra
Astrophysical Relativity, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

Phy.Rev.D.61.024024.pdf
(Publisher version), 262KB

9906054v2.pdf
(Preprint), 330KB

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There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Allen, B., Flanagan, E. E., & Papa, M. A. (1999). Is the squeezing of relic gravitational waves produced by inflation detectable? Physical Review D, 61(2): 024024. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.61.024024.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-580A-5
Abstract
Grishchuk has shown that the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by an inflationary phase in the early Universe has an unusual property: it is not a stationary Gaussian random process. Due to squeezing, the phases of the different waves are correlated in a deterministic way, arising from the process of parametric amplification that created them. The resulting random process is Gaussian but non-stationary. This provides a unique signature that could in principle distinguish a background created by inflation from stationary stochastic backgrounds created by other types of processes. We address the question: could this signature be observed with a gravitational wave detector? Sadly, the answer appears to be "no": an experiment which could distinguish the non-stationary behavior would have to last approximately the age of the Universe at the time of measurement. This rules out direct detection by ground and space based gravitational wave detectors, but not indirect detections via the electromagnetic Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR).