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Investigation of higher-order cognitive functions during exposure to a high static magnetic field

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Lepsien,  Jöran
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Mueller,  Karsten
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Cramon,  D. Yves
Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne, Germany;
Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Möller,  Harald E.
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lepsien, J., Mueller, K., von Cramon, D. Y., & Möller, H. E. (2012). Investigation of higher-order cognitive functions during exposure to a high static magnetic field. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 36(4), 835-840. doi:10.1002/jmri.23727.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-ECF9-B
Abstract
Purpose: To test for potential changes in higher-order cognitive processes related to the exposure to a high static magnetic field. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in two experimental sessions inside a 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. During one session the magnetic field was ramped down. The tasks consisted of six well-established paradigms probing a variety of cognitive functions. Reaction times (RT) and accuracies (AC) were recorded for statistical analysis. Results: The overall performance was very similar in both sessions. Strong task-specific effects (all P < 0.006) were consistent with previously published results. Direct comparisons of task-specific effects between the two sessions (magnetic field on or off) remained insignificance for all paradigms (RT: all P > 0.196; AC: all P > 0.17; no corrections for multiple comparisons). Conclusion: The results did not indicate any apparent safety concerns with respect to cognitive performance in a static magnetic field of a typical whole-body magnet. In addition, comparisons of cognitive effects from testing situations with and without exposure to high static magnetic fields can be considered valid.