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Iconic CO2 time series at risk

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Badawy,  Bakr
Inverse Data-driven Estimation, Dr. C. Rödenbeck, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gerbig,  Christoph
Airborne Trace Gas Measurements and Mesoscale Modelling, Dr. habil. C. Gerbig, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Heimann,  Martin
Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. M. Heimann, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Rödenbeck,  Christian
Inverse Data-driven Estimation, Dr. C. Rödenbeck, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Houweling, S., Badawy, B., Baker, D. F., Basu, S., Belikov, D., Bergamaschi, P., et al. (2012). Iconic CO2 time series at risk. Science, 337(6098), 1038-1040. doi:10.1126/science.337.6098.1038-b.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-F1A5-6
Abstract
The steady rise in atmospheric longlived greenhouse gas concentrations is the main driver of contemporary climate change. The Mauna Loa CO2 time series (1, 2), started by C. D. Keeling in 1958 and maintained today by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) of NOAA, is iconic evidence of the effect of humancaused fossil fuel and land-use change emissions on the atmospheric increase of CO2. The continuity of such records depends critically on having stable funding, which is challenging to maintain in the context of 3- to 4-year research grant funding cycles (3), and is currently threatened by the fi nancial crisis. The ESRL Global Monitoring Division maintains a network of about 100 surface and aircraft sites worldwide at which whole air samples are collected approximately every week for analysis of CO2, CH4, CO, halocarbons, and many other chemical species (4). This is complemented by high-frequency measurements at the Mauna Loa, Barrow, American Samoa, and South Pole observatories, and about 10 North American tall towers. The success of the NOAA program has inspired similar efforts in Europe (5), China (6), India (7), and Brazil (8), with the United Nations World Meteorological Organization providing guidance and precision requirements through the Global Atmosphere Watch program (9), but no funding.