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Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

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Hofreiter,  Michael
Junior Research Group on Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Rohland,  Nadin
Junior Research Group on Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Krause,  Johannes
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
The Leipzig School of Human Origins (IMPRS), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Pääbo,  Svante
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Noonan, J. P., Hofreiter, M., Smith, D., Priest, J. R., Rohland, N., Rabeder, G., et al. (2005). Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears. Science, 309(5734), 597-599. doi:10.1126/science.1113485.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-031A-6
Abstract
Despite the greater information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies have largely been limited to the amplification of mitochondrial sequences. Here we describe metagenomic libraries constructed with unamplified DNA extracted from skeletal remains of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of ~1 megabase of sequence from each library showed that despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 and 1.1% of clones contained cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 base pairs of cave bear genome sequence. Comparison of cave bear and modern bear sequences revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. The metagenomic approach used here establishes the feasibility of ancient DNA genome sequencing programs.