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The genetical history of humans and the great apes

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Kaessmann,  Henrik
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Pääbo,  Svante
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kaessmann, H., & Pääbo, S. (2002). The genetical history of humans and the great apes. Journal of Internal Medicine, 251(1), 1-18. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.00907.x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-0792-5
Abstract
When and where did modern humans evolve? How did our ancestors spread over the world? Traditionally, answers to questions such as these have been sought in historical, archaeological, and fossil records. However, increasingly genetic data provide information about the evolution of our species. In this review, we focus on the comparison of the variation in the human gene pool to that of our closest evolutionary relatives, the great apes, because this provides a relevant perspective on human genetical evolution. For instance, comparisons to the great apes show that humans are unique in having little genetic variation as well as little genetic structure in their gene pool. Furthermore, genetic data indicate that humans, but not the great apes, have experienced a period of dramatic growth in their early history.