English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Expression patterns of hairy, even-skipped, and runt in the spider Cupiennius salei imply that these genes were segmentation genes in a basal arthropod

MPS-Authors
There are no MPG-Authors in the publication available
External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Damen, W. G. M., Weller, M., & Tautz, D. (2000). Expression patterns of hairy, even-skipped, and runt in the spider Cupiennius salei imply that these genes were segmentation genes in a basal arthropod. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 97(9), 4515-4519. doi:10.1073/pnas.97.9.4515.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-0E8D-A
Abstract
There is an ongoing discussion on whether segmentation in different phyla has a common origin sharing a common genetic program. However. before comparing segmentation between phyla, it is necessary to identify the ancestral condition within each phylum. Even within the arthropods it is not clear which parts of the genetic network leading to segmentation are conserved in all groups. In this paper, we analyze the expression of three segmentation genes of the pair-rule class in the spider Cupiennius salei. Spiders are representatives of the Chelicerata, a monophyletic basic arthropod group. We find that in spider embryos, the orthologues for the Drosophila primary pair-rule genes hairy, even-skipped, and runt are expressed in stripes in the growth zone, where the segments are forming, suggesting a role for these genes in chelicerate segmentation. These data imply that the involvement of hairy, even-skipped, and rent in arthropod segmentation is an ancestral character for arthropods and is not restricted to a particular group of insects.