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Photoexcitation of mass/charge selected hemin⁺, caught in helium nanodroplets

MPS-Authors
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Filsinger,  Frank
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Ahn,  Doo-Sik
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Meijer,  Gerard
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Helden,  Gert von
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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c2cp42071f.pdf
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Citation

Filsinger, F., Ahn, D.-S., Meijer, G., & Helden, G. v. (2012). Photoexcitation of mass/charge selected hemin⁺, caught in helium nanodroplets. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 14(38), 13370-13377. doi:10.1039/c2cp42071f.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-19C8-B
Abstract
We report on a method by which mass/charge selected ions are picked up from a linear ion trap by liquid helium droplets. The size distributions of the doped droplets are measured via acceleration experiments. Depending on the source temperature, droplet sizes ranging from tens of thousands to several million helium atoms are obtained. Droplets doped with hemin, an iron containing porphyrin molecule, in the charge state +1 are then investigated using laser spectroscopy. It is observed that excitation with UV/VIS light can lead to ejection of the ion from the droplet. For doped droplets with a median size of B150 000 helium atoms, the absorption of two photons at 380 nm is needed for ejection to become efficient. When droplets become smaller, the ejection efficiency is observed to strongly increase. Monitoring the ejection yield as a function of excitation wavelength can be used to obtain the optical spectrum of hemin⁺. Compared to the spectrum of free gas-phase hemin⁺ at room temperature, the narrower and shifted to the blue.