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Journal Article

Plasticity of animal genome architecture unmasked by rapid evolution of a pelagic tunicate

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Lehrach,  H.
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Reinhardt,  R.
High Throughput Technologies, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Denoeud, F., Henriet, S., Mungpakdee, S., Aury, J. M., Da Silva, C., Brinkmann, H., et al. (2010). Plasticity of animal genome architecture unmasked by rapid evolution of a pelagic tunicate. Science, 330(6009), 1381-1385. doi:10.1126/science.1194167.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-79D0-1
Abstract
Genomes of animals as different as sponges and humans show conservation of global architecture. Here we show that multiple genomic features including transposon diversity, developmental gene repertoire, physical gene order, and intron-exon organization are shattered in the tunicate Oikopleura, belonging to the sister group of vertebrates and retaining chordate morphology. Ancestral architecture of animal genomes can be deeply modified and may therefore be largely nonadaptive. This rapidly evolving animal lineage thus offers unique perspectives on the level of genome plasticity. It also illuminates issues as fundamental as the mechanisms of intron gain.