English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Comparing active and repressed expression states of genes controlled by the Polycomb/Trithorax group proteins.

MPS-Authors

Haas,  Stefan A.
Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

16615.pdf
(Any fulltext), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Beisel, C., Buness, A., Roustan-Espinosa, I. M., Koch, B., Schmitt, S., Haas, S. A., et al. (2007). Comparing active and repressed expression states of genes controlled by the Polycomb/Trithorax group proteins. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America: PNAS, 104(42), 16615-16620. doi:10.1073/pnas.0701538104.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8145-9
Abstract
Drosophila Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins are responsible for the maintenance of stable transcription patterns of many developmental regulators, such as the homeotic genes. We have used ChIP-on-chip to compare the distribution of several PcG/TrxG proteins, as well as histone modifications in active and repressed genes across the two homeotic complexes ANT-C and BX-C. Our data indicate the colocalization of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) with Trx and the DNA binding protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho) at discrete sequence elements as well as significant chromatin assembly differences in active and inactive regions. Trx binds to the promoters of active genes and noncoding transcripts. Most strikingly, in the active state, Pho covers extended chromatin domains over many kilobases. This feature of Pho, observed on many polytene chromosome puffs, reflects a previously undescribed function. At the hsp70 gene, we demonstrate in mutants that Pho is required for transcriptional recovery after heat shock. Besides its presumptive function in recruiting PcG complexes to their site of action, our results now uncover that Pho plays an additional role in the repression of already induced genes.