English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Hormonal signals produced by DAF-9/cytochrome P450 regulate C. elegans dauer diapause in response to environmental cues

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons50166

Gerisch,  Birgit
Ribosomes, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons50070

Antebi,  Adam
Independent Junior Research Groups (OWL), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Gerisch, B., & Antebi, A. (2004). Hormonal signals produced by DAF-9/cytochrome P450 regulate C. elegans dauer diapause in response to environmental cues. Development, 131(8), 1765-1776. doi:10.1242/dev.01068.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8888-E
Abstract
In response to the environment, the nematode C. elegans must choose between arrest at a long-lived alternate third larval stage, the dauer diapause, or reproductive development. This decision may ultimately be mediated by daf-9, a cytochrome P450 related to steroidogenic hydroxylases and its cognate nuclear receptor daf-12, implying organism-wide coordination by lipophilic hormones. Accordingly, here we show that daf-9(+) works cell non-autonomously to bypass diapause, and promote gonadal outgrowth. Among daf-9-expressing cells, the hypodermis is most visibly regulated by environmental inputs, including dietary cholesterol. On in reproductive growth, off in dauer, hypodermal daf-9 expression is strictly daf-12 dependent, suggesting feedback regulation. Expressing daf-9 constitutively in hypodermis rescues dauer phenotypes of daf-9, as well as insulin/IGF receptor and TGFß mutants, revealing that daf-9 is an important downstream point of control within the dauer circuits. This study illuminates how endocrine networks integrate environmental cues and transduce them into adaptive life history choices.