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Journal Article

Optimal superpositioning of flexible molecule ensemble.

MPS-Authors
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Gapsys,  V.
Research Group of Computational Biomolecular Dynamics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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de Groot,  B. L.
Research Group of Computational Biomolecular Dynamics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

1690423.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

1690423_Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 10MB

Citation

Gapsys, V., & de Groot, B. L. (2013). Optimal superpositioning of flexible molecule ensemble. Biophysical Journal, 104(1), 196-207. doi:10.1016/j.bpj.2012.11.003.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-CAD3-D
Abstract
Analysis of the internal dynamics of a biological molecule requires the successful removal of overall translation and rotation. Particularly for flexible or intrinsically disordered peptides, this is a challenging task due to the absence of a well-defined reference structure that could be used for superpositioning. In this work, we started the analysis with a widely known formulation of an objective for the problem of superimposing a set of multiple molecules as variance minimization over an ensemble. A negative effect of this superpositioning method is the introduction of ambiguous rotations, where different rotation matrices may be applied to structurally similar molecules. We developed two algorithms to resolve the suboptimal rotations. The first approach minimizes the variance together with the distance of a structure to a preceding molecule in the ensemble. The second algorithm seeks for minimal variance together with the distance to the nearest neighbors of each structure. The newly developed methods were applied to molecular-dynamics trajectories and normal-mode ensembles of the Aβ peptide, RS peptide, and lysozyme. These new (to our knowledge) superpositioning methods combine the benefits of variance and distance between nearest-neighbor(s) minimization, providing a solution for the analysis of intrinsic motions of flexible molecules and resolving ambiguous rotations.