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New estimate of the carbon sink strength of EU forests integrating flux measurements, flied surveys and space observations: 0.17-0.35 Gt(C)

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Citation

Martin, P. H., Valentini, R., Jacques, M., Fabbri, K., Galati, D., Quarantino, R., et al. (1998). New estimate of the carbon sink strength of EU forests integrating flux measurements, flied surveys and space observations: 0.17-0.35 Gt(C). Ambio, 27(7), 582-584.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-E11B-A
Abstract
The terrestrial biosphere provides a strong sink for greenhouse gases (GHGs). Indeed, global studies confirm that the terrestrial biosphere takes up significant amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, some uncertainty remains attached to the relative strength of the sinks offered by different geographical regions and ecosystems around the world. The present synopsis of an article planned for a forthcoming issue of Ambio confirms the importance of European Union (EU) forests for carbon (C) sequestration. With the signature of the Kyoto Protocol (1) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (2) signed on 11 December 1997, the sequestration of C02-as well as the five other GHGs listed in the Kyoto Protocol, namely methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons-has become an hot political issue. However, the forest sink strength estimation exercise presented in the present synopsis attempts to do more than to generate a pair of policy relevant numbers. Truly, the exercise makes three additional contributions. First,i t offers a genericf rameworkf or the calculation of the net exchange of GHGs between the surface and the atmosphere; second,i t providesa serieso f generici nsights into the problems associated with such calculations; and, third, it sketches out a generic methodology to refine, reengineer, and organize data from sources as different as flux measurementbs y eddy covariance, field surveys, and space observations.