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Application of Classical Resolution for Separation of DL-Serine

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Sistla,  V. S.
Physical and Chemical Foundations of Process Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

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von Langermann,  J.
Physical and Chemical Foundations of Process Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Lorenz,  H.
Physical and Chemical Foundations of Process Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Seidel-Morgenstern,  A.
Physical and Chemical Foundations of Process Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, External Organizations;

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Citation

Sistla, V. S., von Langermann, J., Lorenz, H., & Seidel-Morgenstern, A. (2010). Application of Classical Resolution for Separation of DL-Serine. Chemical Engineering and Technology, 33(5), 780-786. doi:10.1002/ceat.200900578.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-9067-D
Abstract
For resolution of chiral compound-forming substances diastereomeric salt formation is the most important classical separation technique. Diastereomeric salts possess different physical and chemical properties, e.g., solubilities, which facilitate the effective separation via crystallization. A maximum recovery of both diastereomeric salts is usually unachievable when there is a lack of quantitative information regarding solubility and metastable zone width. The present work provides experimental results for the formation of diastereomeric salts of DL-serine. As basic thermodynamic data binary melting and ternary solubility phase diagrams are shown and discussed. A plan for a series of crystallization processes is suggested for the recovery of both salts in pure form with a maximum possible yield. Copyright © 1999-2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved. [accessed May 7, 2010]