English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

A Fixed-Based Flight Simulator Study: The Interdependence of Flight Control Performance and Gaze Efficiency

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  LL
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84111

Nieuwenhuizen,  FM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Chuang, L., Nieuwenhuizen, F., & Bülthoff, H. (2013). A Fixed-Based Flight Simulator Study: The Interdependence of Flight Control Performance and Gaze Efficiency. In D. Harris (Ed.), Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics. Applications and Services: 10th International Conference, EPCE 2013, Held as Part of HCI International 2013, Las Vegas, NV, USA, July 21-26, 2013 (pp. 95-104). Berlin, Germany: Springer.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B47A-7
Abstract
Here, a descriptive study is reported that addresses the relationship between flight control performance and instrument scanning behavior. This work was performed in a fixed-based flight simulator. It targets the ability of untrained novices to pilot a lightweight rotorcraft in a flight scenario that consisted of fundamental mission task elements such as speed and altitude changes. The results indicate that better control performance occurs when gaze is more selective for and focused on key instruments. Ideal instrument scanning behavior is proposed and its relevance for training instructions and visual instrument design is discussed.