English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Poster

Effects of visual attention on neural processing in Rhesus' V1 by simultaneous electrophysiology and BOLD-fMRI

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons83789

Azevedo,  FAC
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84469

Azevedo,  LAC
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84007

Keliris,  G
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Azevedo, F., Azevedo, L., Logothetis, N., & Keliris, G. (2012). Effects of visual attention on neural processing in Rhesus' V1 by simultaneous electrophysiology and BOLD-fMRI. Poster presented at 13th Conference of the Junior Neuroscientists of Tübingen (NeNA 2012): Science and Education as Social Transforming Agents, Schramberg, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B570-4
Abstract
Attention is a cognitive function thought to enhance our ability to select, process, and perceive only a behaviorally relevant fraction of the immense sensory input impinging on our receptors (Knudsen, 2007). Early electrophysiological studies in primates demonstrate that attention can modulate substantially the firing rate of single cells in extrastriate visual areas but has no or little impact in the primary visual cortex (Moran Desimone, 1985). In contrast, attention has been linked to strong bloodoxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal modulations in human subjects (Gandhi et al., 1999). Our goal is to understand how selective visual spatial attention modulates the neuronal activity in primary visual cortex (V1) and how these effects are reflected in the different signals (single unit activity, local field potentials, and BOLD). To this end, we have trained two rhesus macaques to perform an orientation-change detection task in high field fMRI scanners (4.7T, 7T) while we can simultaneously acquire high-resolution fMRI maps and electrophysiological signals. Preliminary results suggest that attention modulates the BOLD and electrophysiological signals in distinct ways.We are currently trying to address the layer specificity of the effects by using MRI compatible multicontact probes and implanted RF coils that provide ultra-high resolution maps of the fMRI activations.