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Conference Paper

Identification of the Transition from Compensatory to Feedforward Behavior in Manual Control

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Drop,  FM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Drop, F., Pool, D., Damveld, H., van Paassen, M., Bülthoff, H., & Mulder, M. (2012). Identification of the Transition from Compensatory to Feedforward Behavior in Manual Control. In 2012 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC) (pp. 2008-2013). Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B5C0-E
Abstract
The human in manual control of a dynamical system can use both feedback and feedforward control strategies and will select a strategy based on performance and required effort. Literature has shown that feedforward control is used during tracking tasks in response to predictable targets. The influence of an external disturbance signal on the utilization of a feedforward control strategy has never been investigated, however. We hypothesized that the human will use a combined feedforward and feedback control strategy whenever the predictable target signal is sufficiently strong, and a predominantly feedback strategy whenever the random disturbance signal is dominant. From the data of a human-in-the-loop experiment we conclude that feedforward control is used in all the considered experimental conditions, including those where the disturbance signal is dominant and feedforward control does not deliver a marked performance advantage.