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Audiovisual crossmodal correspondences and sound symbolism: a study using the implicit association test

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Parise,  CV
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Parise, C., & Spence, C. (2012). Audiovisual crossmodal correspondences and sound symbolism: a study using the implicit association test. Experimental Brain Research, 220(3-4), 319-333. doi:10.1007/s00221-012-3140-6.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B668-E
Abstract
A growing body of empirical research on the topic of multisensory perception now shows that even non-synaesthetic individuals experience crossmodal correspondences, that is, apparently arbitrary compatibility effects between stimuli in different sensory modalities. In the present study, we replicated a number of classic results from the literature on crossmodal correspondences and highlight the existence of two new crossmodal correspondences using a modified version of the implicit association test (IAT). Given that only a single stimulus was presented on each trial, these results rule out selective attention and multisensory integration as possible mechanisms underlying the reported compatibility effects on speeded performance. The crossmodal correspondences examined in the present study all gave rise to very similar effect sizes, and the compatibility effect had a very rapid onset, thus speaking to the automatic detection of crossmodal correspondences. These results are further discussed in terms of the advantages of the IAT over traditional techniques for assessing the strength and symmetry of various crossmodal correspondences.