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A 16-Element Dual-row Transmit Coil Array for 3D RF Shimming at 9.4 T

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Shajan,  G
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Hoffmann,  J
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Pohmann,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Shajan, G., Hoffmann, J., Scheffler, K., & Pohmann, R. (2012). A 16-Element Dual-row Transmit Coil Array for 3D RF Shimming at 9.4 T. In 20th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2012).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B78E-1
Abstract
The well known transmit field inhomogeneity at ultra high field strengths, caused by the shorter RF wavelength in tissue, is most severe in the lower half of the brain. A dual-row 16 element transmit coil that gives the additional flexibility to shim for the lower brain was designed. Numerical investigation revealed excellent static B1 shimming performance. In vivo shimming on a coronal slice demonstrates the ability to improve the transmit field in brain regions that are challenging to image using single-row transmit arrays. The coil can be combined with receive-only arrays for highly sensitive parallel signal reception.