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Human Areas V3A and V6 Compensate for Self-Induced Planar Visual Motion

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Fischer,  E
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bartels,  A
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Fischer, E., Bülthoff, H., Logothetis, N., & Bartels, A. (2012). Human Areas V3A and V6 Compensate for Self-Induced Planar Visual Motion. Neuron, 73(6), 1228-1240. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2012.01.022.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B7FA-F
Abstract
Little is known about mechanisms mediating a stable perception of the world during pursuit eye movements. Here, we used fMRI to determine to what extent human motion-responsive areas integrate planar retinal motion with nonretinal eye movement signals in order to discard self-induced planar retinal motion and to respond to objective (“real”) motion. In contrast to other areas, V3A lacked responses to self-induced planar retinal motion but responded strongly to head-centered motion, even when retinally canceled by pursuit. This indicates a near-complete multimodal integration of visual with nonvisual planar motion signals in V3A. V3A could be mapped selectively and robustly in every single subject on this basis. V6 also reported head-centered planar motion, even when 3D flow was added to it, but was suppressed by retinal planar motion. These findings suggest a dominant contribution of human areas V3A and V6 to head-centered motion perception and to perceptual stability during eye movements.