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Using steady state responses in MEG to study information integration within and across the senses

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Giani,  AS
Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Kleiner,  M
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84112

Noppeney,  U
Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Giani, A., Ortiz, E., Belardinelli, P., Kleiner, M., Preissl, H., & Noppeney, U. (2011). Using steady state responses in MEG to study information integration within and across the senses. Poster presented at 17th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (HBM 2011), Québec City, Canada.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BB90-8
Abstract
How does the brain integrate information within and across sensory modalities to form a unified percept? This question has previously been addressed using transient stimuli, analyzed in the time domain. Alternatively, sensory interactions can be investigated using frequency analyses of steady state responses (SSRs). SSRs are elicited by periodic sensory stimulation (such as frequency modulated tones). In the frequency domain, 'true' signal integration is reflected by non-linear crossmodulation terms (i.e. the sums and differences of the individual SSR frequencies). In addition, two signals may modulate the amplitude of the fundamental and harmonic frequencies of one another. Using visual (V) and auditory (A) SSRs, we investigated whether A and V signals are truly integrated as indexed by crossmodulation terms or simply modulate the expression of each other's dominant frequencies. To manipulate perceptual synchrony, we imposed additional slow modulations on the auditory and visual SSRs either at same or different frequencies. This also enabled us to investigate the integration of two dynamic features within one sensory modality.