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Conference Paper

Does Brief Exposure to a Self-avatar Affect Common Human Behaviors in Immersive Virtual Environments?

MPS-Authors
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Streuber,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Trutoiu,  LC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Mohler,  B
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

Eurographics-2009-Streuber.pdf
(Any fulltext), 462KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Streuber, S., de la Rosa, S., Trutoiu, L., Bülthoff, H., & Mohler, B. (2009). Does Brief Exposure to a Self-avatar Affect Common Human Behaviors in Immersive Virtual Environments? In Eurographics 2009: The 30th Annual Conference of the European Association for Computer Graphics (pp. 33-36). Geneve, Switzerland: European Association for Computer Graphics.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C543-7
Abstract
A plausible assumption is that self-avatars increase the realism of immersive virtual environments (VEs), because self-avatars provide the user with a visual representation of his/her own body. Consequently having a self-avatar might lead to more realistic human behavior in VEs. To test this hypothesis we compared human behavior in VE with and without providing knowledge about a self-avatar with real human behavior in real-space. This comparison was made for three tasks: a locomotion task (moving through the content of the VE), an object interaction task (interacting with the content of the VE), and a social interaction task (interacting with other social entities within the VE). Surprisingly, we did not find effects of a self-avatar exposure on any of these tasks. However, participant’s VE and real world behavior differed significantly. These results challenge the claim that knowledge about the self-avatar substantially influences natural human behavior in immersive VEs.