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Conference Paper

Online blind deconvolution for astronomical imaging

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Harmeling,  S
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Hirsch,  M
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Sra,  S
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schölkopf,  B
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Harmeling, S., Hirsch, M., Sra, S., & Schölkopf, B. (2009). Online blind deconvolution for astronomical imaging. In 2009 IEEE International Conference on Computational Photography (ICCP) (pp. 1-7). Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C549-C
Abstract
Atmospheric turbulences blur astronomical images taken by earth-based telescopes. Taking many short-time exposures in such a situation provides noisy images of the same object, where each noisy image has a different blur. Commonly astronomers apply a technique called “Lucky Imaging” that selects a few of the recorded frames that fulfill certain criteria, such as reaching a certain peak intensity (“Strehl ratio”). The selected frames are then averaged to obtain a better image. In this paper we introduce and analyze a new method that exploits all the frames and generates an improved image in an online fashion. Our initial experiments with controlled artificial data and real-world astronomical datasets yields promising results.