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Dissociating visual and interoceptive rotation during path integration

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Tcheang,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Tcheang, L., Bülthoff, H., & Burgess, N. (2008). Dissociating visual and interoceptive rotation during path integration. Poster presented at 31st European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2008), Utrecht, The Netherlands.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C7E5-9
Abstract
Path integration in darkness is classically thought to be accomplished using interoceptive information. Here we examine the contribution of visual input to the accumulation of rotational information during path integration of a return to origin task, in a fully immersive virtual environment. Nine paths that varied in turn angle and number of turns were used. Path length was approximately constant across trials. During walking the outward legs of a path, a mismatch was introduced between actual rotation and the perceived rotation of a rich virtual environment, which could be increased or decreased. The return leg of the path was performed without vision. The mismatch trials were interleaved with two control conditions; one where vision matched interoceptive information exactly on the outward paths, and one without any visual input. Sixteen subjects (balanced across gender) were tested and a mixed ANOVA analysis showed a significant effect of the visual manipulation. Return directions were consistent with the direction of the visual manipulation suggesting a strong visual component to this 'path integration' task.