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Conference Paper

Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

MPS-Authors
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Bakir,  GH
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Franz,  MO
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ilg, W., Bakir, G., Franz, M., & Giese, M. (2003). Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning. In U. Nunes, A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge, & J. Machado (Eds.), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics (ICAR 2003) (pp. 453-458).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DD3A-D
Abstract
Imitation learning is a promising technique for teaching robots complex movement sequences. One key problem in this area is the transfer of perceived movement characteristics from perception to action. For the solution of this problem, representations are required that are suitable for the analysis and the synthesis of complex action sequences. We describe the method of Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models that allows an automatic segmentation of movements sequences into movement primitives, and a modeling of these primitives by morphing between a set of prototypical trajectories. We use HSTMMs in an imitation learning task for human writing movements. The models are learned from recorded trajectories and transferred to a human-like robot arm. Due to the generalization proper- ties of our movement representation, the arm is capable of synthesizing new writing movements with only a few learning examples.