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Psychophysical results from experiments on recognition categorisation

MPS-Authors
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Graf,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schwaninger,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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GraSchWalBul2002.pdf
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Citation

Graf, M., Schwaninger, A., Wallraven, C., & Bülthoff, H.(2002). Psychophysical results from experiments on recognition categorisation (IST-2000-29375). Commission of the European Union: Cognitive Vision Systems – CogVis.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DE67-1
Abstract
A firm understanding of how the human visual system recognises and categorises objects is important in order to build a successful cognitive vision system. We have reviewed the relevant literature both on visual object recognition and categorisation (chapter 1). Based on this review and the technical annex of this project we have addressed several topics in a series of psychophysical experiments, focusing on structural aspects of recognition memory, object similarity in the context of categorisation, shape transformations in categorisation, the role of context in recognition and categorisation, and the interplay between object motion and shape for categorisation decisions (chapter 2). Based on our psychophysical results we present our view on recognition and categorisation, proposing an integrative framework that serves as a theoretical basis for a computational recognition system grounded in cognitive research (chapter 3).