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Journal Article

Visual processing: How to know where to go.

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Hengstenberg,  R
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hengstenberg, R. (1998). Visual processing: How to know where to go. Nature, 392(6673), 231-232.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E946-E
Abstract
When you move through a landscape containing objects at various distances, the images on your retinas move as you turn and change as you progress. Such image motions (‘optic flow’) are the inevitable consequence of locomotion, and they occur in any creature or robot with eyes. Wylie and colleagues have studied the processing of optic flow in the pigeon brain1,2 and, on page 278 of this issue1, they describe in detail one component of that process.