English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Poster

Auditory discrimination of the German determiners der and den: A mismatch negativity paradigm with 5- and 6-year-old children

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons37856

Cunitz,  Katrin
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19687

Gunter,  Thomas C.
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19570

Brauer,  Jens
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19643

Friederici,  Angela D.
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Cunitz, K., Gunter, T. C., Brauer, J., & Friederici, A. D. (2013). Auditory discrimination of the German determiners der and den: A mismatch negativity paradigm with 5- and 6-year-old children. Poster presented at 3rd IMPRS NeuroCom Summer School, Leipzig, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-12FF-6
Abstract
The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a frontal deflection in the human event-related potential (ERP) that typically occurs when a repeating auditory stimulus (standard stimulus) changes in some manner (deviant stimulus). It occurs only if a stable (auditorysensory) memory representation of the standard stimulus has developed (Picton et al., 2000) and reflects an automatic attention response. The present study used a passive oddball paradigm (e.g. Cowan et al., 1993) with the German determiners der and den as stimuli in a reversed standard-deviant condition. Participants were 5- and 6-year-oldchildren and adults. The ERPs showed the presence of a MMN with a fronto-central distribution in all age groups. For adults the peak was around 300 ms. In contrast for the children, two peaks occurred (5-year-olds: around 380 and 640 ms; 6-year-olds: around 380 and 690 ms). Note, that a comparison between different methods of reference were applied to prove that this ERP was a significant MMN and not the attention-based N2b component. Therefore, the present study provides electrophysiological evidence for the existence of an automatic auditory brain response for the German determiners without attentive processing of deviance.