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Low-frequency neural oscillations support dynamic attending in temporal context

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Henry,  Molly
Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Herrmann,  Björn
Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Henry, M., & Herrmann, B. (2014). Low-frequency neural oscillations support dynamic attending in temporal context. Timing & Time Perception, 2, 62-86. doi:10.1163/22134468-00002011.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-FC67-2
Abstract
Behaviorally relevant environmental stimuli are often characterized by some degree of temporal regularity. Dynamic attending theory provides a framework for explaining how perception of stimulus events is affected by the temporal context within which they occur. However, the precise neural implementation of dynamic attending remains unclear. Here, we provide a suggestion for a potential neural implementation of dynamic attending by appealing to low-frequency neural oscillations. The current review will familiarize the reader with the basic theoretical tenets of dynamic attending theory, and review empirical work supporting predictions derived from the theory. The potential neural implementation of dynamic attending theory with respect to low-frequency neural oscillations will be outlined, covering stimulus processing in regular and irregular contexts. Finally, we will provide some more speculative connections between dynamic attending and neural oscillations, and suggest further avenues for future research.