English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19648

Fritz,  Tom
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Institute for Psychoacoustics and Electronic Music, Ghent University, Belgium;
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19872

Mueller,  Karsten
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

Schmude,  P.
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons20055

Turner,  Robert
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Fritz, T., Renders, W., Mueller, K., Schmude, P., Leman, M., Turner, R., et al. (2013). Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance. European Journal of Neuroscience, 38(7), 3099-3105. doi:10.1111/ejn.12305.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-F8F9-5
Abstract
Helmholtz himself speculated about a role of the cochlea in the perception of musical dissonance. Here we indirectly investigated this issue, assessing the valence judgment of musical stimuli with variable consonance/dissonance and presented diotically (exactly the same dissonant signal was presented to both ears) or dichotically (a consonant signal was presented to each ear – both conso- nant signals were rhythmically identical but differed by a semitone in pitch). Differences in brain organisation underlying inter-subject differences in the percept of dichotically presented dissonance were determined with voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral results showed that diotic dissonant stimuli were perceived as more unpleasant than dichotically presented dissonance, indicating that interactions within the cochlea modulated the valence percept during dissonance. However, the behavioral data also suggested that the dissonance percept did not depend crucially on the cochlea, but also occurred as a result of binaural integration when listening to dichotic dissonance. These results also showed substantial between-participant variations in the valence response to dichotic dis- sonance. These differences were in a voxel-based morphometry analysis related to differences in gray matter density in the inferior colliculus, which strongly substantiated a key role of the inferior colliculus in consonance/dissonance representation in humans.