English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Acute sleep deprivation delays the glucagon-like peptide 1 peak response to breakfast in healthy men.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons59211

Barclay,  J. L.
Research Group of Circadian Rhythms, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons15606

Oster,  H.
Research Group of Circadian Rhythms, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)

1819395.pdf
(Publisher version), 356KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Benedict, C., Barclay, J. L., Ott, V., Oster, H., & Hallschmid, M. (2013). Acute sleep deprivation delays the glucagon-like peptide 1 peak response to breakfast in healthy men. Nutrition and Diabetes, 3: e78. doi:10.1038/nutd.2013.20.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-16FF-4
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Previous experiments have demonstrated that acute sleep loss impairs glucose homeostasis and increases food intake in humans. The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) enhances postprandial insulin secretion and promotes satiety. Hypothesizing that the detrimental metabolic effects of sleep curtailment imply alterations in GLP-1 signaling, we investigated 24-h serum total GLP-1 concentrations during total sleep deprivation (TSD) and a normal sleep/wake cycle (comprising similar to 8h of sleep) in 12 healthy young men. METHODS: Sessions started at 1800 h, and subjects were provided with standardized meals. Assessments of serum GLP-1 took place in 1.5- to 3-h intervals, focusing on the response to breakfast intake (3.8 MJ). RESULTS: Across conditions, 24-h concentration profiles of GLP-1 were characterized by the expected postprandial increases (P<0.001). Although there were no differences in magnitude between conditions (P>0.11), the postprandial GLP-1 peak response to breakfast intake was delayed by similar to 90 min following sleep loss in comparison with regular sleep (P<0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that acute TSD exerts a mild, but discernible effect on the postprandial dynamics of circulating GLP-1 concentrations in healthy men.