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Comparative quantitative analysis reveals preserved structural connectivity patterns in the human and macaque brain

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Citation

Goulas, A., Bastiani, M., Bezgin, G., Uylings, H. B. M., Roebroeck, A., & Stiers, P. (2012). Comparative quantitative analysis reveals preserved structural connectivity patterns in the human and macaque brain. Poster presented at Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, LA, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-6782-B
Abstract
The macaque brain serves as a model for the human brain, but its suitability is challenged by unique human features, including connectivity reconfigurations, which emerged during primate evolution. We perform a quantitative comparative analysis of the whole brain macroscale structural connectivity of the two species. Our findings suggest that the human and macaque brain as a whole are similarly wired. A region-wise analysis reveals many interspecies similarities of connectivity patterns, but also lack thereof, primarily involving cingulate and parietal regions. We unravel a common structural backbone in both species involving a highly overlapping set of regions. This structural backbone, important for mediating information across the brain, constitutes a feature of the primate brain persevering evolution. Our findings illustrate novel evolutionary aspects at the macroscale connectivity level, including the existence of common topological structures, and offer a quantitative translational bridge between macaque and human research.