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Electrophysiological and morphological characteristics of pheromone receptors in male pine sawflies, Diprion pini (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae), and behavioral response to some compounds

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Anderbrant, O., Hansson, B. S., Hallberg, E., Geri, C., Varama, M., Hedenström, E., et al. (1995). Electrophysiological and morphological characteristics of pheromone receptors in male pine sawflies, Diprion pini (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae), and behavioral response to some compounds. Journal of Insect Physiology, 41(5), 395-401. doi:10.1016/0022-1910(94)00126-2.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-5F38-B
Abstract
The morphology and physiology of pheromone receptors on the antennae of male pine sawflies, Diprion pini L., were investigated. Using scanning electron microscopy, five sensillar types were recognized. The type shown to be pheromone sensitive has a long (50-70 mu m) cuticular hair, is single-walled, and is innervated by 8 or 9 sensory cells as revealed by transmission electronmicroscopy. Electroantennography (EAG) showed similar activity of the acetate and propionate of (2S,3R,7R)-3,7-dimethyl-2-tridecanol, precursor of the main constituent of the female-produced sex pheromone. No other isomer induced any significant response. Single-sensillum recordings confirmed the results of the EAG, and also showed that several neurons were excited by the active compound. EAG recordings and combined gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection indicated that esters of three 3,7-dimethyl-2-pentadecanol (diprionol) isomers were active, but field tests could not demonstrate any behavioural effect. Diprionol esters are used as sex pheromones by all other pine sawflies investigated so far, and D. pini is thus the first diprionid species shown to use a different sex pheromone.