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Thermochemical Heat Storage for High Temperature Applications – A Review

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Felderhoff,  Michael
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Urbanczyk,  Robert
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;
Institut für Energie- und Umwelttechnik e.V.;

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Citation

Felderhoff, M., Urbanczyk, R., & Peil, S. (2013). Thermochemical Heat Storage for High Temperature Applications – A Review. Green, 3(2), 113-123. doi:10.1515/green-2013-0011.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-A337-6
Abstract
Heat storage for high temperature applications can be performed by several heat storage techniques. Very promising heat storage methods are based on thermochemical gas solid reactions. Most known systems are metal oxide/steam (metal hydroxides), carbon dioxide (metal carbonates), and metal/hydrogen (metal hydrides) systems. These heat storage materials posses high gravimetric and volumetric heat storage densities and because of separation of the reaction products and their storage in different locations heat losses can be avoided. The reported volumetric heat storage densities are 615, 1340 and 1513 [kWh m−3] for calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2, calcium carbonate CaCO3 and magnesium iron hydride Mg2FeH6 respectively. Additional demands for gas storage decrease the heat storage density, but metal hydride systems can use available hydrogen storage possibilities for example caverns, pipelines and chemical plants.