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To feed or not to feed: Plant factors located in the epidermis, mesophyll, and sieve elements influence pea aphid’s ability to feed on legume species

MPS-Authors
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Schwarzkopf,  Alexander
Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Rosenberger,  Daniel
Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Niebergall,  Martin
MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Gershenzon,  Jonathan
Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Kunert,  Grit
Department of Biochemistry, Prof. J. Gershenzon, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

GER353.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)

GER353s1.zip
(Supplementary material), 393KB

Citation

Schwarzkopf, A., Rosenberger, D., Niebergall, M., Gershenzon, J., & Kunert, G. (2013). To feed or not to feed: Plant factors located in the epidermis, mesophyll, and sieve elements influence pea aphid’s ability to feed on legume species. PLoS One, 8(9): e75298. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075298.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-6FD0-8
Abstract
The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum HARRIS), a legume specialist, encompasses at least 11 genetically distinct sympatric host races. Each host race shows a preference for a certain legume species. Six pea aphid clones from three host races were used to localize plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior on four legume species. Aphid performance was tested by measuring survival and growth. The location of plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding was determined using the electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique. Every aphid clone performed best on the plant species from which it was originally collected, as well as on Vicia faba. On other plant species, clones showed intermediate or poor performance. The most important plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior were localized in the epidermis and sieve elements. Repetitive puncturing of sieve elements might be relevant for establishing phloem feeding, since feeding periods appear nearly exclusively after these repetitive sieve element punctures. A combination of plant factors influences the behavior of pea aphid host races on different legume species and likely contributes to the maintenance of these races