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The joint flanker effect: Less social than previously thought

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Dolk,  Thomas
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Prinz,  Wolfgang
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Dolk, T., Hommel, B., Prinz, W., & Liepelt, R. (2014). The joint flanker effect: Less social than previously thought. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(5), 1224-1230. doi:10.3758/s13423-014-0583-8.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-CEDB-B
Abstract
Research on joint action has been taken to suggest that actors automatically co-represent the tasks and/or actions of co-actors. However, recent findings on the joint Simon effect have provided evidence for a nonsocial account, which renders automatic co-representation unlikely. In the present study, we aimed to test whether a nonsocial account is also feasible for the joint version of the flanker task. In particular, we manipulated the social nature of the “co-actor” who could be another human or a Japanese waving cat. Contrary to the social interpretation of the joint flanker effect, the results demonstrated a “joint” flanker effect, irrespective of whether participants shared the task with another person or with the Japanese waving cat.