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Experimental entanglement distribution by separable states

MPS-Authors
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Eberle,  Tobias
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Händchen,  Vitus
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Schnabel,  Roman
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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1303.1082.pdf
(Preprint), 3MB

PRL111_230505.pdf
(Any fulltext), 843KB

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Citation

Vollmer, C. E., Schulze, D., Eberle, T., Händchen, V., Fiurasek, J., & Schnabel, R. (2013). Experimental entanglement distribution by separable states. Physical Review Letters, 111: 230505. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.230505.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-1176-F
Abstract
The distribution of entanglement between macroscopically separated parties represents a crucial protocol for future quantum information networks. Surprisingly, it has been theoretically shown that two distant systems can be entangled by sending a third mediating system that is not entangled with either of them. Such a possibility seems to contradict the intuition that to distribute entanglement, the transmitted system always needs to be entangled with the sender. Here, we experimentally distribute entanglement by exchanging a subsystem and successfully prove that this subsystem is not entangled with either of the two parties. Our implementation relies on the preparation of a specific three-mode Gaussian state containing thermal noise that demolishes the entanglement in two of the three bipartite splittings. After transmission of a separable mode this noise can be removed by quantum interference. Our work demonstrates an unexpected variant of entanglement distribution and improves the understanding necessary to engineer multipartite quantum information networks.