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Remote control - triggering of brain autoimmune disease in the gut

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Wekerle,  Hartmut
Emeritus Group: Neuroimmunology / Wekerle, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

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Berer,  Kerstin
Emeritus Group: Neuroimmunology / Wekerle, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

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Krishnamoorthy,  Gurumoorthy
Emeritus Group: Neuroimmunology / Wekerle, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wekerle, H., Berer, K., & Krishnamoorthy, G. (2013). Remote control - triggering of brain autoimmune disease in the gut. CURRENT OPINION IN IMMUNOLOGY, 25(6), 683-689. doi:10.1016/j.coi.2013.09.009.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-18B6-1
Abstract
Converging evidence indicates that multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory dennyelinating disease of the central nervous system, is caused by brain-specific, self-reactive T lymphocytes. These are normal components embedded in the human immune system throughout healthy life. Only upon activation in the periphery, the T cells assume properties that enable them to breakthrough the vascular blood-brain barrier and to invade the brain white matter. While activation has been traditionally associated with microbial infections, recently, studies of animal models revealed a critical role of the commensal gut flora as a key triggering factor. These findings may pave the way to new strategies to treat MS and other human autoimmune diseases, and commend a reevaluation of dietary approaches.