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Lattice Instability and Competing Spin Structures in the Double Perovskite Insulator Sr2FeOsO6

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Paul,  A. K.
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Yan,  B. H.
Binghai Yan, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Adler,  P.
Peter Adler, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Jansen,  Martin
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Felser,  C.
Claudia Felser, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Paul, A. K., Reehuis, M., Ksenofontov, V., Yan, B. H., Hoser, A., Többens, D. M., et al. (2013). Lattice Instability and Competing Spin Structures in the Double Perovskite Insulator Sr2FeOsO6. Physical Review Letters, 111: 167205, pp. 1-5. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.167205.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-1E3E-5
Abstract
The semiconductor Sr2FeOsO6, depending on temperature, adopts two types of spin structures that differ in the spin sequence of ferrimagnetic iron-osmium layers along the tetragonal c axis. Neutron powder diffraction experiments, 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectra, and density functional theory calculations suggest that this behavior arises because a lattice instability resulting in alternating iron-osmium distances fine-tunes the balance of competing exchange interactions. Thus, Sr2FeOsO6 is an example of a double perovskite, in which the electronic phases are controlled by the interplay of spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom.