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Perceptual decision making: Drift-diffusion model is equivalent to a Bayesian model

MPG-Autoren
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Bitzer,  Sebastian
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Park,  Hame
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Kiebel,  Stefan J.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Biomagnetic Center, Jena University Hospital, Germany;

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Zitation

Bitzer, S., Park, H., Blankenburg, F., & Kiebel, S. J. (2014). Perceptual decision making: Drift-diffusion model is equivalent to a Bayesian model. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8: 102. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00102.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-825F-5
Zusammenfassung
Behavioral data obtained with perceptual decision making experiments are typically analyzed with the drift-diffusion model. This parsimonious model accumulates noisy pieces of evidence toward a decision bound to explain the accuracy and reaction times of subjects. Recently, Bayesian models have been proposed to explain how the brain extracts information from noisy input as typically presented in perceptual decision making tasks. It has long been known that the drift-diffusion model is tightly linked with such functional Bayesian models but the precise relationship of the two mechanisms was never made explicit. Using a Bayesian model, we derived the equations which relate parameter values between these models. In practice we show that this equivalence is useful when fitting multi-subject data. We further show that the Bayesian model suggests different decision variables which all predict equal responses and discuss how these may be discriminated based on neural correlates of accumulated evidence. In addition, we discuss extensions to the Bayesian model which would be difficult to derive for the drift-diffusion model. We suggest that these and other extensions may be highly useful for deriving new experiments which test novel hypotheses.