English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Neural control of vascular reactions: Impact of emotion and attention

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19907

Okon-Singer,  Hadas
Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, Israel;
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19850

Mehnert,  Jan
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;
Department of Machine Learning, TU Berlin, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19737

Hoyer,  Jana
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19705

Hellrung,  Lydia
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons73238

Schaare,  Herma Lina
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19621

Dukart,  Jürgen
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Laboratoire de Recherche en Neuroimagerie (LREN), Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland;
Pharma Research and Early Development, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland;

/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany;
Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Okon-Singer, H., Mehnert, J., Hoyer, J., Hellrung, L., Schaare, H. L., Dukart, J., et al. (2014). Neural control of vascular reactions: Impact of emotion and attention. The Journal of Neuroscience, 34(12), 4251-4259. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0747-13.2014.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-0F04-4
Abstract
This study investigated the neural regions involved in blood pressure reactions to negative stimuli and their possible modulation by attention. Twenty-four healthy human subjects (11 females; age = 24.75 ± 2.49 years) participated in an affective perceptual load task that manipulated attention to negative/neutral distractor pictures. fMRI data were collected simultaneously with continuous recording of peripheral arterial blood pressure. A parametric modulation analysis examined the impact of attention and emotion on the relation between neural activation and blood pressure reactivity during the task. When attention was available for processing the distractor pictures, negative pictures resulted in behavioral interference, neural activation in brain regions previously related to emotion, a transient decrease of blood pressure, and a positive correlation between blood pressure response and activation in a network including prefrontal and parietal regions, the amygdala, caudate, and mid-brain. These effects were modulated by attention; behavioral and neural responses to highly negative distractor pictures (compared with neutral pictures) were smaller or diminished, as was the negative blood pressure response when the central task involved high perceptual load. Furthermore, comparing high and low load revealed enhanced activation in frontoparietal regions implicated in attention control. Our results fit theories emphasizing the role of attention in the control of behavioral and neural reactions to irrelevant emotional distracting information. Our findings furthermore extend the function of attention to the control of autonomous reactions associated with negative emotions by showing altered blood pressure reactions to emotional stimuli, the latter being of potential clinical relevance.