English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Book Chapter

Developing Catalytic Asymmetric Acetalizations

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons58495

Coric,  Ilija
Research Department List, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons59069

Vellalath,  Sveekumar
Research Department List, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58836

Müller,  Steffen
Research Department List, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58484

Cheng,  Xu
Research Department List, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58764

List,  Benjamin
Research Department List, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Coric, I., Vellalath, S., Müller, S., Cheng, X., & List, B. (2013). Developing Catalytic Asymmetric Acetalizations. In L. J. Gooßen (Ed.), Topics in Organometallic Chemistry (pp. 165-193). Berlin: Springer. doi:10.1007/3418_2012_53.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-E4AD-2
Abstract
Acetals are among the most common stereocenters in Nature. They form glycosidic bonds that link together essential molecules of life, carbohydrates, including starch and cellulose, the most abundant organic material on Earth. Stereogenic acetals are also common motifs in other natural products, from small insect pheromones to highly complex spiroacetal polyketides. Although far less common than O,O-acetals, chiral N,N-, N,O-, and N,S-acetals are structural motifs also found in a number of natural products and pharmaceuticals. Here, recent progress towards chiral acetals using asymmetric Bronsted acid catalysis is summarized, with particular emphasis on O,O-acetalizations. In this context the development of novel catalyst classes, namely spirocyclic phosphoric acids and confined Bronsted acids, proved crucial and is also presented.