English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Active nuclear import of single-stranded oligonucleotides and their complexes with non-karyophilic macromolecules

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons95345

Shoeman,  Robert L.
Coherent diffractive imaging, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Analytical Protein Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Hartig, R., Shoeman, R. L., Janetzko, A., Grueb, S., & Traub, P. (1998). Active nuclear import of single-stranded oligonucleotides and their complexes with non-karyophilic macromolecules. Biology of the Cell, 90(5), 407-426. doi:10.1016/S0248-4900(98)80090-7.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-A459-6
Abstract
The objective of this investigation was to characterize intranuclear accumulation of oligonucleotides and their adducts with non-karyophilic compounds in cultured animal cells and thus to present a model system for nucleic acid-mediated nuclear import. In digitonin-permeabilized cells, nuclear uptake of 3'-FITC-labeled, single-stranded 25-mer oligodeoxyribonucleotides was independent of added cytosolic protein, largely energy-dependent, inhibitable by wheat germ agglutinin but not by N-ethylmaleimide, and a function of their base composition. When coupled to FITC-labeled streptavidin or streptavidin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, the oligonucleotides delivered the proteins to the nuclear interior with rates roughly proportional to their karyophilicity as free molecules. Transport activity was also demonstrated for single-stranded oligoribonucleotides. The transport was energy-dependent, inhibited by GMP-PNP and wheat germ agglutinin, but unaffected by N-ethylmaleimide. Nuclear import of oligo(dG)25/protein adducts needed 3 to 4 oligonucleotide signals per complex and the signal had to be at least 15 nucleotides long. Micro-injection experiments showed that the results obtained with digitonin-permeabilized cells are not artifacts of a quasi-intact cellular system. These data were confirmed by electron microscopy employing complexes of oligodeoxyribonucleotides with streptavidin-peroxidase-bovine serum albumin-1 nm gold. In permeabilized cells, the complexes docked to the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complexes, were translocated through the central pore channel and accumulated in large quantities in the nuclear baskets before they were released into the nucleoplasm. These results demonstrate that nuclear uptake of oligonucleotides and their complexes is an active process mediated by nuclear pore complexes, which, at least regarding its cytoplasmic component, is different from the pathway requiring classical nuclear localization signals.