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Atomic-scale quantification of grain boundary segregation in nanocrystalline material

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Herbig,  Michael
Atom Probe Tomography, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Raabe,  D.
Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Li,  Yujiao
Alloy Design and Thermomechanical Processing, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Choi,  Pyuck-Pa
Atom Probe Tomography, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Zaefferer,  Stefan
Microscopy and Diffraction, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Goto,  Shoji
Akita University, Tegata Gakuencho, Akita 010-8502, Japan;
Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Herbig, M., Raabe, D., Li, Y., Choi, P.-P., Zaefferer, S., & Goto, S. (2014). Atomic-scale quantification of grain boundary segregation in nanocrystalline material. Physical Review Letters, 112: 126103. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.126103.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-1F94-1
Abstract
Grain boundary segregation leads to nanoscale chemical variations that can alter a material's performance by orders of magnitude (e. g., embrittlement). To understand this phenomenon, a large number of grain boundaries must be characterized in terms of both their five crystallographic interface parameters and their atomic-scale chemical composition. We demonstrate how this can be achieved using an approach that combines the accuracy of structural characterization in transmission electron microscopy with the 3D chemical sensitivity of atom probe tomography. We find a linear trend between carbon segregation and the misorientation angle omega for low-angle grain boundaries in ferrite, which indicates that omega is the most influential crystallographic parameter in this regime. However, there are significant deviations from this linear trend indicating an additional strong influence of other crystallographic parameters (grain boundary plane, rotation axis). For high-angle grain boundaries, no general trend between carbon excess and omega is observed; i.e., the grain boundary plane and rotation axis have an even higher influence on the segregation behavior in this regime. Slight deviations from special grain boundary configurations are shown to lead to unexpectedly high levels of segregation.