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Journal Article

Decoding vigilance with NIRS

MPS-Authors
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Bogler,  Carsten
Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany;
Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;
Max Planck Fellow Research Group Attention and Awareness, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19850

Mehnert,  Jan
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Berlin Neuroimaging Center, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;
Department of Machine Learning, TU Berlin, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19699

Haynes,  John-Dylan
Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany;
Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;
Max Planck Fellow Research Group Attention and Awareness, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany;

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Bogler_DecodingVigilance.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

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Citation

Bogler, C., Mehnert, J., Steinbrink, J., & Haynes, J.-D. (2014). Decoding vigilance with NIRS. PLoS One, 9(7): e101729. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101729.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-F63F-B
Abstract
Sustained, long-term cognitive workload is associated with variations and decrements in performance. Such fluctuations in vigilance can be a risk factor especially during dangerous attention demanding activities. Functional MRI studies have shown that attentional performance is correlated with BOLD-signals, especially in parietal and prefrontal cortical regions. An interesting question is whether these BOLD-signals could be measured in real-world scenarios, say to warn in a dangerous workplace whenever a subjects' vigilance is low. Because fMRI lacks the mobility needed for such applications, we tested whether the monitoring of vigilance might be possible using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS is a highly mobile technique that measures hemodynamics in the surface of the brain. We demonstrate that non-invasive NIRS signals correlate with vigilance. These signals carry enough information to decode subjects' reaction times at a single trial level.