English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Effects of an Early Experience Involving Training in a T-Maze Under either Denial or Receipt of Expected Reward through Maternal Contact

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Stamatakis, A., Diamantopoulou, A., Panagiotaropoulos, T. I., Raftogianni, A., & Stylianopoulou, F. (2013). Effects of an Early Experience Involving Training in a T-Maze Under either Denial or Receipt of Expected Reward through Maternal Contact. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 4: 178, pp. 1-4. doi:10.3389/fendo.2013.00178.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-1297-9
Abstract
The mother is the most salient stimulus for the developing pups and a number of early experience models employ manipulation of the mother-infant interaction. We have developed a new model which in addition to changes in maternal behavior includes a learning component on the part of the pups. More specifically, pups were trained in a T-maze and either received (RER rats) or were denied (DER) the reward of maternal contact, during postnatal days 10–13. Pups of both experimental groups learn the T-maze, but the RER do so more efficiently utilizing a procedural-type of learning and memory with activation of the dorsal basal ganglia. On the other hand, the DER experience leads to activation of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala in the pups. In adulthood, male DER animals exhibit better mnemonic abilities in the Morris water maze and higher activation of the hippocampus, while they have decreased brain serotonergic activity, exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and proactive aggressive behavior in the resident-intruder test. While male RER animals assume a reactive coping style in this test, and showed increased freezing during both contextual and cued memory recall following fear conditioning.