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Mapping of arterial transit time by intravascular signal selection

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Mildner,  Toralf
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Mueller,  Karsten
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Trampel,  Robert
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Driesel,  Wolfgang
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Möller,  Harald E.
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mildner, T., Mueller, K., Hetzer, S., Trampel, R., Driesel, W., & Möller, H. E. (2014). Mapping of arterial transit time by intravascular signal selection. NMR in Biomedicine, 27(5), 594-609. doi:10.1002/nbm.3098.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-298E-C
Abstract
The arterial transit time (δa) is a potentially important physiological parameter which may provide valuable information for the characterization of cerebrovascular diseases. The present study shows that δa can be measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) applied quasi-continuously in an amplitude-modulated fashion at the human neck. Imaging was performed using short repetition times and excitation flip angles of 90°, which resulted in the selection of an ASL signal of mostly intravascular origin. Model-independent estimates of δa were obtained directly from the temporal shift of the ASL time series. An extended two-compartment perfusion model was developed in order to simulate the basic features of the proposed method and to validate the evaluation procedure. Vascular structures found in human δa maps, such as the circle of Willis or cerebral border zones, hint at the sensitivity of the method to most sizes of arterial vessels. Group-averaged values of δa measured from the carotid bifurcation to the tissue of interest in selected regions of the human brain ranged from 925 ms in the insular cortex to 2000 ms in the thalamic region.