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The ETS family member GABP alpha modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer

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Butter,  Falk
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Mann,  Matthias
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Sharma, N. L., Massie, C. E., Butter, F., Mann, M., Bon, H., Ramos-Montoya, A., et al. (2014). The ETS family member GABP alpha modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer. NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH, 42(10), 6256-6269. doi:10.1093/nar/gku281.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-C525-2
Abstract
In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABP alpha, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABP alpha enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABP alpha has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABP alpha bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABP alpha in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention.