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The role of carbonaceous deposits in the activity and stability of Ni-based catalysts applied in the dry reforming of methane

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Mette,  Katharina
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Kühl,  Stefanie
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Behrens,  Malte
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Düdder, H., Kähler, K., Krause, B., Mette, K., Kühl, S., Behrens, M., et al. (2014). The role of carbonaceous deposits in the activity and stability of Ni-based catalysts applied in the dry reforming of methane. Catalysis Science & Technology, 4(9), 3317-3328. doi:10.1039/c4cy00409d.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-C6D0-7
Abstract
Highly stable Ni catalysts with varying Ni contents up to 50 mol% originating from hydrotalcite-like precursors were applied in the dry reforming of methane at 800 and 900 °C. The integral specific rate of methane conversion determined after 10 h on stream was 3.8 mmol s-1 gcat-1 at 900 °C. Due to the outstanding high activity, a catalyst mass of just 10 mg had to be used to avoid operating the reaction in thermodynamic equilibrium. The resulting WHSV was as high as 1.44 × 106 ml gcat-1 h-1. The observed axial temperature distribution with a pronounced cold spot was analyzed by computational fluid dynamics simulations to verify the strong influence of this highly endothermic reaction. Transmission electron microscopy and temperature-programmed oxidation experiments were used to probe the formation of different carbon species, which was found to depend on the catalyst composition and the reaction temperature. Among the formed carbon species, multi-walled carbon nanofibers were detrimental to the long-term stability at 800 °C, whereas their formation was suppressed at 900 °C. The formation of graphitic carbon at 900 °C originating from methane pyrolysis played a minor role. The methane conversion after 100 h of dry reforming at 900 °C compared to the initial one amounted to 98% for the 25 mol% Ni catalyst. The oxidative regeneration of the catalyst was achieved in the isothermal mode using only carbon dioxide in the feed.