English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Early word recognition and later language skills

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons30

Cutler,  Anne
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia ;
Emeriti, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

brainsci-04-00532.pdf
(Publisher version), 938KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Junge, C., & Cutler, A. (2014). Early word recognition and later language skills. Brain sciences, 4(4), 532-559. doi:10.3390/brainsci4040532.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-2427-D
Abstract
Recent behavioral and electrophysiological evidence has highlighted the long-term importance for language skills of an early ability to recognize words in continuous speech. We here present further tests of this long-term link in the form of follow-up studies conducted with two (separate) groups of infants who had earlier participated in speech segmentation tasks. Each study extends prior follow-up tests: Study 1 by using a novel follow-up measure that taps into online processing, Study 2 by assessing language performance relationships over a longer time span than previously tested. Results of Study 1 show that brain correlates of speech segmentation ability at 10 months are positively related to 16-month-olds’ target fixations in a looking-while-listening task. Results of Study 2 show that infant speech segmentation ability no longer directly predicts language profiles at the age of five. However, a meta-analysis across our results and those of similar studies (Study 3) reveals that age at follow-up does not moderate effect size. Together, the results suggest that infants’ ability to recognize words in speech certainly benefits early vocabulary development; further observed relationships of later language skills to early word recognition may be consequent upon this vocabulary size effect.